This week in international marketing: International SEO | Hacks for International Expansion | Languages for the Future | Invest in Obscure Languages | Designing for Translation

by Julia Litvin

1. Multilingual Digital Marketing and international SEO: the future trends of the localisation industry

As many of you are marketing internationally or towards multicultural and multilingual communities within your own country, you not only need to provide content in those target languages, but you also want to ensure that your content is actually found. What’s the use of going through the effort of localising (translating) your website if nobody visits it?

Source: Multilingual Digital Marketing and international SEO: the future trends of the localisation industry


2. Going Global: 22 Growth Hacks & Resources for International Expansion

For a marketer, it’s exciting to see your company grow and transcend the borders of your home country. On the flip side, international expansion can make your job significantly more complex.

Should your international goals vary from your regular goals? How will you handle international communication? What about prioritizing markets? Who comes first?

Source: Going Global: 22 Growth Hacks & Resources for International Expansion


3.Languages for the Future. Which languages the UK needs most and why

This report seeks to provide a strategic analysis of the UK’s long-term language needs, looking at a variety of economic, geopolitical, cultural and educational indicators and scoring different languages against these. It identifies a list of ten languages which will be of crucial importance for the UK’s prosperity, security and influence in the world in the years ahead. 

Source: Languages for the future


4. Why Your Company Should Invest in Obscure Languages

Most Western organisations operate globally in English with content localised for each major market in which they operate. While organisations will cater for Chinese, French and Spanish readers/speakers/listeners – how many cater for potential customers of more obscure languages such as Basque, Tamil or Amharic?

Does it matter and does it make business sense? Discover why companies should invest more in obscure languages and address these markets directly in their own languages.

Source: Why Your Company Should Invest in Obscure Languages


5. Designing for Translation: 5 Tips to Get Your Projects Global-Ready

In 2006, the average US website was available in 14 languages. Last year, it was 30. From manufacturers beginning to export to Fortune 500s like Coca-Cola or Ralph Lauren, American brands understand the importance of going global now more than ever before. And it’s not just websites either—brochures, display ads, catalogues—if it’s in the collateral, it’s in other languages. So whether you deal with multilingual projects now or will need to in the future, if you don’t start each one designing for translation, translation will redesign for you.

That’s because replacing one language for another is much more complicated than changing out lorem ipsum for copy. English text can become 30% longer in Spanish and can shrink 15% in Dutch. Translate the words, and suddenly your beautifully-designed brochure can look cramped or have tiny bits of white space all over it.

So when a project is destined to go international, how do you make sure your design looks good no matter the language?

Source: Designing for Translation: 5 Tips to Get Your Projects Global-Ready


This was our 'best of the week'. Next week we will continue to provide you with the interesting and current news on digital globalization, culture, language, localization and international digital marketing.

Stay tuned.